Friday, July 10, 2015

Atticus, Amy and a Geisha

To Kill a Mockingbird was a spellbinding experience. It makes you realize that goodness is a tangible entity that lives and breathes-even in sleepy Southern towns- and that it can be found sometimes in the most unlikely places (or people, in this case). It speaks of morality and equality, the courage to get up and exercise it, and the circumstances involved with flowing against the current. To Kill a Mockingbird is one of those stories that will probably stay with me until I die.

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Reading Gone Girl was like riding a psychotic coaster ride. It starts with slow, staccatos and then takes you up and down with its many, many twists. To me though, Gone Girl isn't merely a story of a man who lost his psychotic wife, it is a platform that solidifies the basics in any relationship: Do you know who your partner is? And as the book mystifies: Are we still originals? Or are we merely collections of personalities that we scrapbook-ed from movies and books and songs and pop culture?

(Note: Write better diary entries because Amy Elliot Dunne does it better.)

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I regret not buying Memoirs of a Geisha when I had the chance to yesterday. The book is literally haunting me.

4 comments:

  1. Have you read John Green's Paper Towns? I remembered Amy Elliot Dunne through its girl-protagonist, Margo Roth Spiegelman, though the latter is the younger version. It prompted me to make an FB status that went like this: If the world be filled with this type of girls-women it would be fun (and bloody!). // With the "missing' thing, intelligent women and diaries/letters, Sputnik Sweetheart comes to mind. :)

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    1. No. I haven't read Paper Towns. And yes, the world will be a lot more interesting with a lot more of these females. Maybe frail, damsels in distress, are already a thing of the past?

      Sputnik Sweetheart's one of my favorites actually. Murakami's works usually revolve around similar themes and the 'missing woman' + distressed husband/man + woman as receptacle of epiphanies + cats formula's his signature.

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    2. I’m thinking that perhaps a John Green’s is too mainstream for your taste. Haha.
      Actually, Sputnik Sweetheart is my first of Murakami’s. Because it’s one of your favorites, glad that I’ve made the right choice.
      With the towering pile of books to be read, I’m on one-book-per-author right now. Haha.

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    3. Haha. Maybe. I tend to hate mainstream. You should really read Murakami's 1Q84. It's a long book but it's quite the story.

      Interesting side note: there was a time, 2013 or 2014 I think, when I refused to read anything that's not Murakami. Lol.

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